Prevent Pet Suffocation Releases Pet Suffocation Survey Results

Image of a laptop with a Survey for Prevent Pet Suffocation on it

Image of Survey for Prevent Pet Suffocation

Infographic of Pet Suffocation Survey Results Using Graphs and Icons

Infographic of Pet Suffocation Survey Results

Prevent Pet Suffocation Logo

Prevent Pet Suffocation Logo

Prevent Pet Suffocation releases results from their pet suffocation survey to further its mission to spread awareness.

The data from this survey is invaluable in our efforts to prevent pet suffocation.”
— Bonnie Harlan, Founder of Prevent Pet Suffocation
HOUSTON, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, January 23, 2024 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Prevent Pet Suffocation recently released a new infographic depicting results of their pet suffocation survey. The data from this survey will help us further our international mission to spread awareness to educate the public on the suffocation risks our pets face from all types of food packaging.

With over 4400 respondents, the survey results highlighted the most common types of food packaging pets suffocated in, as well as the most common locations where pets found the food bag or container. Fifty percent of pet owners were home when the suffocation event occurred while 19% of respondents were gone from the home less than 15 minutes. The biggest culprit of pet suffocation was chip bags at 47% while the kitchen counter and kitchen trash, at 31%, were where pets found the food packaging most often. The vast majority of pets who suffocated were dogs of all breeds, sizes, and ages at 89%. Of the respondents who were able to attempt Pet CPR, 10% were successful.

“The data from this survey is invaluable in our efforts to prevent pet suffocation worldwide." said Bonnie Harlan, Founder of Prevent Pet Suffocation. "I typically hear from two or three distraught pet owners a week who’ve lost their dog or cat to pet suffocation. We want to continue educating the public on the suffocation risks our pets face from chip bags, snack bags, cereal bags, pet food bags, containers, and other food packaging. Unfortunately, pet suffocation happens within minutes, and the vast majority of people have never heard of it until it happens to their pet. By then, it’s usually too late.” See below to watch a video message from Bonnie Harlan regarding the survey results.

Prevent Pet Suffocation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit whose mission is to raise awareness of the suffocation risks our pets face from chip bags, snack bags, pet food bags, and other food packaging to prevent pet suffocation. Prevent Pet Suffocation was founded in 2012 by Bonnie Harlan, who lost her rescue dog, Blue, when he suffocated in a chip bag in December 2011.

Chip bags and other food packaging pose serious suffocation risks to our pets. Too many pets, especially dogs, have died from suffocating in chip bags, cereal boxes, snack bags, pet treat bag liners, and pet food bags. A lot of these bags are made from a strong mylar-like material (like a balloon) which helps keep snacks fresher. When a curious dog puts his head into the bag looking for leftover crumbs, the bag creates a vacuum-like seal around the dog’s neck. As he tries to breathe, the bag tightens, cutting off the oxygen. When a dog cannot remove the food bag from his head, he will usually start to panic, desperately running around until he collapses and dies from asphyxiation. This happens within minutes.

We can reduce the number of accidental pet deaths by educating the public on the dangers of these types of bags. Most people do not know that mylar bags are a suffocation hazard to their animals, and they often do not find out until it happens to their pet. Many pet owners have arrived home or walked into another room of the house and found their dog lying motionless with a chip bag or other type of bag on his head. The more people are aware of this risk, the more pet owners can do to ensure their pet is safe. Awareness is our best defense against pet suffocation!

With the data from our new survey, we can better target our initiatives when addressing safety guidelines and develop a more focused approach to reaching the percentage of the public who is still unaware of pet suffocation. Please take the survey whether you have lost a pet to suffocation or not. It only takes a few minutes. The survey is ongoing and will be updated as new data presents. The survey is posted on our website, Facebook page, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Click this link to access survey.

Please visit our website and follow us on our social media accounts to learn all the safety tips you can use to prevent pet suffocation in your home, car, yard, and community. In addition, if you know someone who has experienced pet suffocation, please have them contact us at info@preventpetsuffocation.com. Our Facebook Page also serves as a wonderful support group for grieving pet owners.

Bonnie Harlan
Prevent Pet Suffocation, Inc.
+1 844-777-9880
info@preventpetsuffocation.com
Visit us on social media:
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Instagram
YouTube
TikTok
Other

PPS Survey Results Reel