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Orthopedic Surgeons Suggest These Safety Tips When Carving Pumpkins

Pumpkin Carving Safety

Pumpkin Carving Safety

We see several injuries from pumpkin carving every year. Most are minor, but the more serious ones that make it to a hand surgeon can involve injury to your tendons or nerves and require surgery.”
— David Holt, MD
BEND, OR, UNITED STATES, October 13, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ -- During the months of October and November, pumpkins become the main centerpiece in many homes. For some of us, it wouldn’t be fall without having a little creative fun with a pumpkin. We bake with them, we decorate our homes with their fun colors and textures, and we put extra thought into carving our neighborhood’s greatest entryway masterpiece. There’s nothing quite as nostalgic as carving pumpkins. Whether you’re a child or grown adult, pumpkin carving is an activity loved by many.

The majority of the 1.5 billion pounds of fresh pumpkin varieties grown in the United States each year are sold for Halloween. Increasing pumpkin sales during the fall months also means an increase in people visiting the emergency room with hand injuries from slicing into a pumpkin. Various injuries can occur when dealing with a pumpkin’s hard flesh and a sharp cutting utensil. “We see several injuries from pumpkin carving every year. Most are minor, but the more serious ones that make it to a hand surgeon can involve injury to your tendons or nerves and require surgery,” says Dr. David Holt, orthopedic surgeon at The Center.

Common hand injuries caused by pumpkin carving can include minor cuts or lacerations in the non-dominant hand, stab and puncture wounds in the hand, severed tendons and ligaments, permanent nerve damage in hands and fingers, flexor and extensor tendon injuries, or loss of function and motion in the hand

While most of the injuries from pumpkin carving may only need stitches, others may need to be seen by a hand specialist, such as a hand surgeon, who can restore the hand’s movement and function.

To avoid hand injuries this fall season, here are some recommendations from hand and wrist specialist, Dr. Holt. “Use the right tools. There are pumpkin carving kits that include special stencils and tools without needing a knife. If you do use a knife, avoid using your kitchen knives. Use a knife with blunt edges and serrations. Keep the top of the pumpkin on while you carve so that you are not tempted to put your hand inside the pumpkin, and keep a close eye on any children at all times.”

Should you cut your finger or hand, bleeding from minor cuts will often stop on its own by applying direct pressure to the wound with a clean cloth. If continuous pressure does not slow or stop the bleeding after 15 minutes, an emergency room visit may be required.

Jenny King
The Center Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research
+1 5413823344
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