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Technology Professional Raises Alarm on Cybersecurity Threats

Cybersecurity Lessons

Mindcote IT services

number: 973-664-9500

Local Technology professional at Mindcore shares the 3 things he wishes every business leader would start doing.

As a business owner, you have a responsibility to do the right thing for yourself, your employees and your customers. This means getting a trusted advisor who can show you how to protect your company.”
— Matt Rosenthal, CEO of Mindcore
FAIRFIELD,, NEW JERSEY, UNITED STATES, January 17, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ -- This December, local technology professional and CEO of Mindcore, Matt Rosenthal, received a call from a small business while they were in the midst of a cybersecurity attack.

The company lost tens of thousands of dollars when hackers stole their banking information and transferred money from their account in addition to stealing nearly seven million rewards points attached to their credit card account.

Immediately after, they noticed that their information was being used to attempt to take out several lines of credit on new home purchases.

“No matter how big or how small your firm is, cybersecurity is massively important” said Rosenthal. “You cannot underestimate threats online. You cannot think you’re too big or too small. Nobody is safe.”

Rosenthal and his team responded in real-time by identifying the breach and closing gaps in the company’s security, quickly ending an attack that nearly crippled the company.

Cybersecurity Threats

Cyberthreats continue to evolve each year but statistics show that the majority of successful attacks happen when scammers use email or text messages to trick you into giving them your personal information. These are known as Phishing Emails and while their methods are common, most companies still do not give their staff the training they need to be able to recognize these kind of threats.

“If your business generates revenue and you have employees then that means you have a responsibility to do the right thing–for yourself, your employees and your customers. This means getting an advisor you can trust who can show you how to protect your company,” said Matt Rosenthal.

3 Ways to Protect Your Company

1. Alert Your Staff: Most cybersecurity battles are fought in the inbox. The problem is that most staff today don’t even know what to be on the lookout for and when to raise the alarm.

2. Train Your Staff: One click on a fraudulent email can cripple a company and cost them hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenue and time. By teaching their staff how to recognize fake websites or incorrect URLs, they can stop attacks before they happen.

3. Empower Your Staff: When a company alerts and trains its staff, they are empowering them with the tools and knowledge they need to be proactive and security savvy. When an attack happens, your staff should be your first line of defense.

Each year, cyberthreats put thousands of companies out of business. By educating their staff, they can open up a powerful new front on the war against cyberthreats and by doing so they can ensure that their company not only survives, but thrives in the digital world.

About Mindcore

Most companies struggle to keep up with their IT. Mindcore develops customized IT solutions to help you take back control of your technology, streamline your business and outperform your competition. Mindcore is located in Fairfield New Jersey and serves all industries including banking, financing and investment, building and construction, business, insurance, and nonprofit sectors.

Matt Rosenthal
Mindcore IT Solutions
+1 973-664-9500
email us here

Cyber Attack Disaster Plus 3 Cybersecurity Tips


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