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The Future of Work

   American College of the Building Arts 649 Meeting Street, Charlestown, SC 29403

TV Program Features S.C. College for Educating Artisans

A student can study stone carving with Professor Warren, a master who has worked on the Lincoln and Wells cathedrals in England, and study Dickens’ ‘Hard Times’ in an English literature class,”
— Llewellyn King, Host "White House Chronicle"
WASHINGTON, D.C., USA, April 12, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ -- The American College of the Building Arts (ACBA), which aims to create “the educated artisan,” is featured in a two-part series on “White House Chronicle” on PBS.

“It is certainly one of the most interesting stories we have covered in our 20 years on the air,” Llewellyn King, the program’s executive producer and host, says of the series, the first of which will air April 13.

“White House Chronicle” is interested in the future of work. This series joins other episodes on that subject, including a recent one featuring a discussion with professors Thomas Kochan of MIT and John Savage of Brown on artificial intelligence and displacement of workers.

The college, located in a rehabilitated 1897 trolley barn in Charleston, S.C., is an American higher education groundbreaker. It is the country’s “only four-year, private liberal arts, nonprofit college dedicated to educating artisans with the skills to create with their hands, reason with their minds, and contribute to and preserve our world’s architectural treasures,” according to ACBA.

In the first episode, King interviews ACBA President Colby M. Broadwater III, a retired Army lieutenant general, Simeon Warren, chair of traditional masonry, and India Lee, a student in forged architectural iron.

The college’s academic and artisan courses build upon each other. “A student can study stone carving with Professor Warren, a master who has worked on the Lincoln and Wells cathedrals in England, and study Dickens’ ‘Hard Times’ in an English literature class,” King said. ​

Students specialize in one of six artisan crafts: forged architectural iron, architectural carpentry, timber framing, architectural stone, plaster and masonry. Architectural drawing is a requirement.

The college offers two- and four-year programs. Women comprise one-third of the student body.

The college is small. Compared to the big colleges and universities, ACBA is like a speck of stone dust on its masonry classroom floor, Broadwater said. But its students are “highly employable” and with their academic and artisan skills, and about a third of its graduates start their own businesses.

At present, the college has fewer than 100 students. But it is attracting students of all ages, from high school graduates to military veterans to those seeking a new career.

“Consider what an artisan has: a marketable skill. You can’t say that for the average liberal arts graduate,” King said.

Broadwater sums up the college’s uniqueness this way, “Who says an artisan shouldn’t be educated?”

“White House Chronicle” airs on PBS and public, educational and government (PEG) cable access stations and select commercial stations. The program’s audio airs four times weekends on SiriusXM Radio’s P.O.T.U.S. (Politics of the United States), Channel 124.

Episodes can be viewed on the program’s website, whchronicle.com, as well as an interactive map of carrying stations. Episodes are available on Vimeo.

For further information, contact:

Ginna Waddell, American College of the Building Arts, at waddellg@buildingartscollege.us or (843) 266-7842, Ext. 106.

Llewellyn King
White House Chronicle
(202) 441-2702
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