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Financial Investigations Target Deadbeats

It’s usually possible to find out what makes a deadbeat tick. And also to find out when a deadbeat only LOOKS like one, but actually has assets and bank deposits stashed somewhere. That’s when you need an experienced financial investigator.

Demarr's financial investigation program provides important new tools for creditors owed money; for financial institutions, and to injured plaintiffs.

HUNTINGTON BEACH, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, March 29, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Financial investigations offer answers about where money comes from, how it moves, and where it gets spent.

What is a deadbeat? The dictionary says “an idle, feckless or disreputable person; a layabout, loafer, idler, good-for-nothing, bum, (or) sponger.” Another refinement is “A parent or someone who calls him- or herself a parent, but does nothing for their children.” A private investigator is frequently called on to investigate a “deadbeat.” Deadbeats can be both human and corporate – sometimes businesses don’t pay their bill, too.

So how to go about conducting a financial investigation?
• Start with what you know: Full name, addresses, address history, birthdate, Social Security Number. Date and state of incorporation, if it’s a business.

• Move on to public records: This area is also known as “Open Source.” Many records are public, and available if you know where to look. Courthouses offer public records of lawsuits and judgments. County recorder’s offices offer records of liens, real property holdings, and mortgage defaults. Secretary of State records offer information about the owners of a corporation, certain kinds of liens against equipment, and information about where to serve process on most businesses. And it’s amazing what can be learned from Google, social media like Facebook and LinkedIn, and targeted website searches in specific cases. See: PINow.com, “Public Records Search.”

• Obtain information from confidential databases: Here is where the private investigator can really add value. Private investigators build their own databases over time. And they have access to confidential databases with in-depth information about employment history, address history, known associates and corporate ownership history.

• Bank information: Though federal and state legislation limits what can be investigated nowadays about specific bank accounts, there are legitimate ways to obtain bank account information. Creditors, spouses, and commercial firms can provide information. Sometimes it just comes down to going out and interviewing people.

• And the government even helps: The U.S. Justice Department publishes a Financial Investigation Guide. If you want to investigate someone’s finances, it makes sense to use the same checklists the government does (Financial Investigations Guide).

It’s usually possible to find out what makes a deadbeat tick. And also to find out when a deadbeat only LOOKS like one, but actually has assets and bank deposits stashed somewhere. That’s when you need an experienced financial investigator.


John A. DeMarr, P.I. Toll free 877-493-3463, www.demarr.com


John A. Demarr, Private Investigator’s new statewide financial investigation program provides important new tools for creditors owed money; for financial institutions and insurance companies; and, perhaps most importantly, to injured plaintiffs across California.

Sources:
• PINow.com, "Public Records Search"
• United States Justice Dept., "Financial Investigations Guide"

We can serve process in California, across the United States, in the United Kingdom, Canada, Mexico, Europe, Asia and Latin America.

John A. DeMarr, P.I.,
877-493-3463 Toll-free 877-493-3463.
www.demarr.com

Questions? To learn more: www.demarr.com.

John DeMarr
John A DeMarr, P.I.
877 493 3463
email us here


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