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Paulette Chaffee Comments on The University of California Awarding $80M in Research Grants to Combat Climate Change

Paulette Chaffee discusses the new University of California program providing $80 million in research grants designed to combat climate change.

FULLERTON, CA, USA, January 24, 2023 /EINPresswire.com/ -- Climate change is a significant threat to the planet, and The University of California is looking to spur research to help combat the problem.

Lifelong educator Paulette Chaffee points out that the university is awarding research grants totaling $80 million as part of a $185 million program the state has set aside to support research on climate change.

Researchers from any institution of higher learning in California can apply for an award through the program. The university said the program's goal is to find solutions that can help tackle climate change.

Paulette Chaffee explains that there will be two different grants that will be available through the program.

The first is the Climate Action Seed Grant, which will have a value of $500,000 through $2 million and seek to support smaller, more targeted projects. The second is the Climate Action Matching Grant, which will help fund more extensive projects with a total value of $2 million to $10 million.

Funding will be available for the next two years through the program. Interested applicants can submit letters of intent through January 17.

All grants will be awarded through peer review, and panels will include experts from across the country.

Paulette Chaffee reminds applicants that those who will be deemed successful, according to UC, are those that include community partners, provide tangible outcomes, and integrate a collaborative and multi-disciplinary approach.

All applicants are required to include stakeholder partnerships with end users who are impacted by climate issues in California.

According to UC officials, the program's goal is to "create practical solutions that advance climate resilience and social equity, particularly in communities where the effects of climate change are felt most acutely."

As a lifelong educator, Paulette Chaffee knows how important equity is. Creating equitable solutions to major issues can have a lasting impact on other areas of life. It even trickles down into the classroom as well.

The other $105 million in the overall program will help to support UC's climate grants and initiatives being undertaken on campus. Much of this will be focused on supporting climate action entrepreneurship.

Paulette Chaffee says that all grants are being managed through UC's SmartSimple grants management system, which can be found on the university's website.

Anyone who has questions about the program or wants to learn more about the climate action funding should visit the University of California Research & Innovation website.

Jessica Brown
Mercury News Media
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