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Phyllis Quinlan of MFW Consultants to be Featured on CUTV News Radio

If you’re in healthcare, even if you’re in housekeeping or the kitchen, you’re a caregiver, and everyone in healthcare can benefit from the skills of emotional intelligence.”
— Phyllis Quinlan

FLUSHING, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES, June 16, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ -- There’s an old saying among nurses: “Doctors don’t save your life. Nurses do.” Spend any amount of time in a hospital and this becomes immediately clear; it’s the hard work and dedication of committed, compassionate nurses who restore you to good health and return you home to your family.

People who choose to become professional caregivers were called to it. It requires a compassionate soul. So what happens when it becomes just another job and you dread going to work on Monday?

Ten years ago, Phyllis Quinlan, received a very strange phone call from a nurse hoping to find a job where she no longer had to take care of patients.

“My immediate reaction was she must have been injured or she is battling an illness,” recalls Quinlan. “She said, ‘I’m healthy as a horse, I just don’t want to take care of patients anymore and if I don’t see another nurse again that would be fine.’ I was dumbfounded. I realized I was talking to my first client with full-blown burnout, or “compassion fatigue.”

Quinlan is a nurse with over 40 years of experience and the founder of MFW Consultants, a coaching practice to help nurses overcome compassion fatigue.

“Compassion fatigue is an insidious process; it is the slow erosion of your compassionate nature.,” explains Quinlan. “Over time, the reason you chose to become a caregiver becomes very remote until you can no longer connect with the reason you’re doing what you’re doing. It leaves you with an inability to derive any satisfaction or joy from caring.”

Quinlan says while it is possible to recover from compassion fatigue, it takes work. The most effective way to overcome compassion fatigue, she says, is to develop the four competencies of Emotional Intelligence: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship management.

“If you’re in healthcare, even if you’re in housekeeping or the kitchen, you’re a caregiver, and everyone in healthcare can benefit from the skills of emotional intelligence,” says Quinlan. “Through introspection and curiosity, we determine the origins of your feelings of compassion fatigue and honor them. This insight into yourself, this self-compassion, nourishes your compassionate nature. When your intention and action are realigned, the emotional connection to your work is restored.”

“Nothing gets easier. The workload is still the same, the pressure is still the same, but you manage it differently. It’s a transformational process.”

CUTV News Radio will feature Phyllis Quinlan in a two-part interview with Doug Llewelyn on June 20th at 12pm EDT and with Jim Masters on June 27th at 12pm EDT.

Listen to the show on BlogTalkRadio.

If you have a question for our guest, call (347) 996-3389.

For more information on MFW Consultants, visit http://www.mfwconsultants.com

Lou Ceparano
CUTV News
(631) 850-3314
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